Important Information About Nevada Dog Dite Laws

Nevada does not currently have a statewide dog bit statute. However, it does have Statute 202.500 regarding dangerous or vicious dogs. This statute characterizes any dog as a “dangerous” dog if it, without provocation, has on two different occasions in 18 months, behaved menacingly to someone to a degree that they had to defend themselves because the dog was off its owner’s property or was not properly confined. Whenever, without provocation, a dog actually injures or kills someone, it is may then be considered a “vicious” dog.

There are criminal penalties regarding keeping or selling a dog characterized as “vicious” or “dangerous” as defined by the statute. Dog owners can still face civil liability if their dog bites someone, even if it does not fit the definition of a dangerous or vicious dog according to Nevada’s criminal law.

Owner responsibilities

Nevada is referred to as a “one bite” state. That used to mean that the owner could only be held liable if they knew their dog might bite someone; basically, every dog was allowed one free bite. That is no longer the case. An owner can be held liable if the breed of their dog is more likely to bite someone, recent behavior by the dog indicates it may bite someone, the owner is negligent, or they violate local laws regarding dog ownership. Determining owner liability in instances of dog bites can be complex. A Las Vegas, NV premises liability lawyer is familiar with all state and local laws.

Clark County municipal regulations for dogs

If a dog bite occurs in the city of Las Vegas, the owner and victim of the bite are required to report the incident to city officials. Dog owners in Las Vegas are also subject to the municipal regulations of Clark County. The state of Nevada does allow people to keep and even sell “dangerous” dogs if they comply with all state and municipal regulations regarding dangerous dogs. It is illegal in the state of Nevada to keep, sell, or give away a dog designated as “vicious” by Nevada Statute 202.500. A premises liability lawyer can advise individuals who have been bitten by a vicious dog on the responsibilities of the owner and obtaining damages for lost wages, pain and suffering, and punitive damages.

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