The Fatal Four: Las Vegas Construction Accidents

Las Vegas supports one of the largest construction industries in the country. With high-rise hotels and large-scale commercial building projects, the industry also has one of the highest accident and injury rates with large numbers of fatalities each year.

Construction Site Accidents

A variety of accidents occurs on construction sites. Each year, thousands of construction workers are injured on the job. Common injuries seen by a personal injury attorney Las Vegas include broken bones, back, neck and head injuries, brain injuries, burns, blindness, loss of limbs, and death. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports show that approximately 22 percent of employee fatalities in 2015 occurred within the construction industry.

OSHA has identified the four most deadly types of construction accidents. Referred to as the “fatal four,” these accidents kill over 600 construction workers every year. In 2015, these accidents accounted for almost 65 percent of workplace fatalities in the construction industry. The fatal four include:

Falls

In 2015, 364 construction workers were killed from falls, accounting for almost 40 percent of all construction industry deaths. Construction site falls from ladders, roofs and scaffolding are the most common causes of fatalities. Workers who work on high-rise buildings and who use lifts or scaffolding without protected sides are at the highest risk of deadly falls.

Crushing

In 2015, 67 construction workers were crushed to death after being caught in or between heavy machinery. Crushing fatalities are typically caused when workers get caught between construction equipment and other objects, and when structures or equipment collapse. If workers don’t sustain fatal injuries, they often lose limbs and suffer permanent disabilities.

Falling Objects

In 2015, 90 construction workers were killed by falling objects. A personal injury attorney Las Vegas often sees cases where construction workers on lower levels in high-rise hotels are struck and killed by falling objects including heavy equipment from higher floors. Workers are often unaware of the danger and have little or no warning to get out of harm’s way.

Electrocution

In 2015, 81 construction workers died on the job from electrocution. Electricity is often used on construction sites to power lights, power tools, and heavy machinery. If construction workers don’t have proper safety equipment, they are at risk for burns, explosions, and electrocution when performing tasks near power circuits. Common electrical hazards include improper use of extension cords, improper use of electrical equipment, and coming into contact with power lines.

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